Suicide or Murder? The Mysterious Death of Meriwether Lewis

TweetShareShareMeriwether Lewis led one of America’s greatest expeditions and was the apple of Thomas Jefferson’s eye. To this day the name “Meriwether Lewis” sells books, inspires audiences and provokes pride. His leadership of the Corps of Discovery, along with William Clark, remains one our nation’s most enduring tales. In his post-expedition years he enjoyed fame…

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America the Republic: Why We Were Never Constituted as a Pure Democracy

Plato

TweetShareShare Lately, there’s been a lot of chatter about our democracy or democratic  form of government. Some political commentators use fear to suggest our “democracy is in peril” if certain people from the opposing political party are elected. Unfortunately, this type of fear mongering has been around since America was constituted. The problem with that…

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John Quincy Adams: The Hell Hound of Slavery

The Hell Hound of Slavery

TweetShareShareIt’s one thing to be a “career politician.” It’s quite another to be so influential that your very presence commands respect, honor and adoration. But John Quincy Adams was a “cut above the rest” type of man. In fact, few American leaders have exceeded the contributions of John Quincy Adams, the lawyer son of Founding…

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Alexis De Tocqueville: The French Man Who Saw America’s Past, Present and Future

TweetShareShare “[It’s] the most comprehensive and penetrating analysis of the relationship between character and society in America that has ever been written.”[1] That’s how one historian described Alexis de Tocqueville’s Democracy in America; a work many consider among the most influential literary works of the 19th century. Published in two volumes between 1835 and 1840,…

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America the Secular? Flipping the Script on the Founding of a Nation

Secular Amerca

TweetShareShareSince the 1980s, it’s been a popular refrain to refer to America’s founding as secular in nature. Proponents of secularism often use selective quotes to promote their nonreligious agendas (1). Many Founding Fathers are now considered “Deist” (read: agnostic, atheist). These include heavyweights like Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Paine and George Washington. Perhaps we…

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The Big Switch That Wasn’t: The Dixiecrats, Race and 1964

TweetShareShareIt’s known as “The Big Switch.” A historical moment when Southern Democrat politicians converted to Republicanism and refashioned the G.O.P. into a racist political party (according to their opponents). In an heated Twitter exchange between Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Ortez (D-NY) and Senator Ted Cruz (R-TX), this “big switch” was the grist of the Millennial Democrat’s argument.…

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John Ericsson: The Swede that Saved the Union

Lunch atop a skyscraper

TweetShareShareWhen it comes to America’s naval history, few had more influence on battleship design than a man named John Ericsson. In fact, it’s a Swedish story better than ABBA. Ericsson was a Swedish American who revolutionized steamship propulsion through his invention of the screw propeller. He also invented the first submarine boat, self-propelled torpedo and…

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Dred Scott: The Man Behind the U.S. Supreme Court’s Worst Decision

Dred Scott

TweetShareShareMany legal scholars believe the Dred Scott decision was the worst by a U.S. Supreme Court. Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes called it the Supreme Court’s “greatest self-inflicted wound.” But why did it happen? Who was Dred Scott? And why should we know his story?  DRED SCOTT was born a slave in Virginia (1799). His…

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Four Chaplains Day: A Day of Faith, Sacrifice and Service

TweetShareShare It’s a day the U.S. military has celebrated since 1951, but the tale has grown dusty and dark with time. February 3 is “Four Chaplains Day.” Never heard of it? You should. It’s a fascinating story of courage, service and faith. It’s the tale of the day the U.S.A.T. Dorchester–packed with over 900 men–was…

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