Alexis de Tocqueville: The French Man Who Saw America’s Past, Present and Future

TweetShareShare “[It’s] the most comprehensive and penetrating analysis of the relationship between character and society in America that has ever been written.” That’s how one historian described Alexis de Tocqueville’s Democracy in America; a work considered among the most influential books of the 19th century. Published in two volumes between 1835 and 1840, Alexis de…

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Lewis and Clark: How Two Women Saved the Corps of Discovery

Sacagawea

TweetShareShare In May of 1804 the Corps of Discovery, led by captains Meriwether Lewis and William Clark went on pursuit of a fabled Northwest passage. They’d be gone over two years. Along the way they’d meet dozens of Indian tribes, including the fierce Sioux and Blackfoot. They’d traverse on keelboat, canoe, horseback and by foot through…

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The Pain of Thomas Paine

Thomas Paine

TweetShareShareIn 1776 Thomas Paine was a “rock star” among American patriots. His writings inspired a loosely united thirteen colonies to revolt against the great British Empire. But Paine lived down to his name. He’d die a “penniless drunk in Manhattan,” scorned by most of the Founding Fathers. Only six people attended his funeral.   Thomas…

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Saint Patrick: The Tale of a Slave for Christ

TweetShareShareWho was Saint Patrick?” Why do we celebrate his name today? His legacy is much more than festive green parties and shamrocks. Patrick was born around 385 BC in Britain during a tumultuous time. At the time, Britain was under Roman rule and his family lived in constant fear. Because the great Roman army was…

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John Marrant: America’s First Black Preacher

John Marrant

TweetShareShareHe was among America’s first black preachers. A fiery Methodist who converted thousands—blacks, Indians, whites—to Christianity in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. His life story–of only 35 years–has inspired millions. John Marrant was born a free black June 15, 1755 in New York City. When his father died, at four, his mother moved…

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George Washington Carver: God’s Peanut Man

George Washington Carver

TweetShareShare“When you can do the common things of life in an uncommon way, you will command the attention of the world.” These weren’t just words to George Washington Carver (1864-1943). They were his legacy. Few Americans lived bigger and better lives. Carver was born a slave, but eventually became a botanist, educator, conservationist, and artist.…

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Samuel Sharpe: The Jamaican Slave Preacher That Sparked Abolition

Samuel Sharpe

TweetShareShare“I would rather die upon yonder gallows than live my life in slavery.” Those were the passionate words of a young Black Jamaican slave preacher. His story changed the world…and that makes this tale worth telling. His name is Samuel “Daddy” Sharpe and he was born on a plantation owned by Samuel and Jane Sharpe…

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The True History of Valentine’s Day

TweetShareShare Valentine’s Day is February 14. It’s traditionally a day of love. But what’s the story behind the day? A man named Valentine of Terni lived in the 3rd century AD. It was a period of deadly plagues and severe Christian persecution. The great Roman Empire was starting its long disintegration. With a small pox…

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