Martin Luther King, Jr.: The Making of an American Moses (Part 1)

Martin Luther King, Jr

TweetShareShare In Black American history there have been many influential people. Phyllis Wheatley. Sojourner Truth. Harriet Tubman. Frederick Douglass. Booker T. Washington. George Washington Carver. Jackie Robinson. But few transformed America and his race more than Martin Luther King, Jr. It’s why every January, America stops to celebrate his birthday. He’s on par with Washington…

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Martin Luther King, Jr.: The Making of an American Moses (Part 3)

Martin Luther King speaks

TweetShareShare   In PART ONE, the individuals and events that influenced King’s childhood and adolescence were addressed.  In PART TWO, Martin Luther King’s rise to inspire and lead the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s. +++++++++++++++++++++   By 1968, Martin Luther King, Jr. had lived up to his royal last name. His speeches were legendary…

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The Big Switch That Wasn’t: The Dixiecrats, Race and 1964

TweetShareShareIt’s known as “The Big Switch.” A historical moment when Southern Democrat politicians converted to Republicanism and refashioned the G.O.P. into a racist political party (according to their opponents). In an heated Twitter exchange between Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Ortez (D-NY) and Senator Ted Cruz (R-TX), this “big switch” was the grist of the Millennial Democrat’s argument.…

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Four Chaplains Day: A Day of Faith, Sacrifice and Service

TweetShareShare It’s a day the U.S. military has celebrated since 1951, but the tale has grown dusty and dark with time. February 3 is “Four Chaplains Day.” Never heard of it? You should. It’s a fascinating story of courage, service and faith. It’s the tale of the day the U.S.A.T. Dorchester–packed with over 900 men–was…

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First World Series: How Baseball Opened the American Century

On This Day in History October 1, 1903 First World Series

TweetShareShareNo sport framed 20th century American culture more than baseball. In fact, America’s story–how we worked, what we believed, the battles we fought and the glory we shared–is found in the game. From the rise of a new industrialized economy to racism (against Jew, Italian, blacks) to celebrity culture, baseball was there. And every time…

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The Real Thing: Coke Advertising

First Coca Cola Advertisement

TweetShareShareI’ll confess. I’m deeply biased when it comes to my favorite carbonated beverage. If it’s not a Coca-Cola, it’s not a cola. I don’t know if I was born with this affection (some might call it an affliction), but here I am 58 years later still sipping Coke…albeit in more sugar-free varieties. My favorite is…

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The Model T Defined an Era

The Final Model T is Produced

TweetShareShareThe Model T was not Henry Ford’s first car, but it might’ve been his best. Also known as the “Tin Lizzie” or “Leaping Lena” or “Jitney” or “Flivver,” the Model T was the first truly affordable automobile. In 1999, it was honored as the “most influential car of the 20th century.” Manufactured between 1908 and…

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Network News is Born!

CBS News Debuted

TweetShareShareIf your over 40, you remember a day when the three big networks (ABC, CBS, NBC) dominated the television news landscape. Indeed, the 1960s and 1970s were the “golden age” of network news, featuring personalities like Walter Cronkite, David Brinkley and Howard K. Smith. There were also new emerging (and future) stars like Dan Rather…

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The First Family of Radio

TweetShareShare You’ve probably heard of the radio shows “The Shadow,” “Abbott and Costello,” “Amos ‘n Andy” or “Ozzy and Harriet,” but what about One Man’s Family? This popular American radio soap opera broadcasted from 1932 to 1959. Developed by Carlton E. Morse, One Man’s Family was the longest-running uninterrupted dramatic serial in the history of…

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