Four Chaplains Day: A Day of Faith, Sacrifice and Service

TweetShareShare It’s a day the U.S. military has celebrated since 1951, but the tale has grown dusty and dark with time. February 3 is “Four Chaplains Day.” Never heard of it? You should. It’s a fascinating story of courage, service and faith. It’s the tale of the day the U.S.A.T. Dorchester–packed with over 900 men–was…

Read More

Court Packing: How Franklin D. Roosevelt Reshaped the U.S. Supreme Court

TweetShareShareIn 1937 nobody was more popular than Franklin D. Roosevelt. His “New Deal”–hinged to Social Security and unemployment benefits–catapulted FDR to a 523-8 electoral landslide (60.8% of the popular vote) to a second term in 1936. Only Ronald Reagan would come close to that margin of victory in 1984 with 525-13 electoral votes (58.8% popular…

Read More

The Day Television Lost Control: “The Heidi Game”

TweetShareShareIt was the football game that changed the rules of broadcasting. It was the game that showed how the democratic, decentralized people’s voice could overrule the authoritative, centralized control of network brass. It was the game where a little girl in the Swiss Alps and superstar athletes toppled how we would watch live sports forever.…

Read More

The Day Teddy Made America a New Global Nation

TweetShareShare In our global culture and shrinking world–thanks to cyber communications–it’s hard to believe there was a time (120 years ago) when few people ventured more than a day’s walk (20 miles) from home.    That was the significance of this day in 1906. It was the first time a U.S. President visited another country…not…

Read More

First World Series: How Baseball Opened the American Century

On This Day in History October 1, 1903 First World Series

TweetShareShareNo sport framed 20th century American culture more than baseball. In fact, America’s story–how we worked, what we believed, the battles we fought and the glory we shared–is found in the game. From the rise of a new industrialized economy to racism (against Jew, Italian, blacks) to celebrity culture, baseball was there. And every time…

Read More

Six Months That Changed The World

TweetShareShare You could call it the Great Cultural Earthquake. Within a brief span of six months, three separate historical events happened that completely reshaped America. If you are over 65 years of age, you might remember them: 1. Martin Luther King’s “I Have A Dream” speech (8/28/1963) 2. The assassination of John F. Kennedy (11/22/1963)…

Read More

The Model T Defined an Era

The Final Model T is Produced

TweetShareShareThe Model T was not Henry Ford’s first car, but it might’ve been his best. Also known as the “Tin Lizzie” or “Leaping Lena” or “Jitney” or “Flivver,” the Model T was the first truly affordable automobile. In 1999, it was honored as the “most influential car of the 20th century.” Manufactured between 1908 and…

Read More

The Race of the First Kentucky Derby

TweetShareShareOn May 17, 1875, America’s most storied horse race was first ran: the Kentucky Derby. The winning jockey was Oliver Lewis aboard a horse name Aristides. We have forgotten how black Americans, in the beginning, not only ran these thoroughbreds but also cared for them. In this first running of the Kentucky Derby, thirteen out…

Read More

America Embraces Debt

TweetShareShare“Put it on my card!” It’s the American way. We buy now, pay later.  The history for card purchases is nothing new. In fact, it was first described in an Edward Bellamy utopian work titled Looking Backward (1887). Bellamy employed the term “credit card” in his work as a way for a person to spend…

Read More