July 8, 1835: The Day a Judge, the Liberty Bell and the Founding Era Ended

John Marshall

TweetShareShare One night a stranger sought refuge in a rural tavern. Exhausted from his travels, the hungry, unkempt visitor longed for solitude. However, the man quickly realized he had interrupted a debate regarding the “merits of the Christian religion.” In a long, contentious argument, several young men discussed biblical truth related to Christ’s divinity and…

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America the Republic: Why We Were Never Constituted as a Pure Democracy

Plato

TweetShareShare Lately, there’s been a lot of chatter about our democracy or democratic  form of government. Some political commentators use fear to suggest our “democracy is in peril” if certain people from the opposing political party are elected. Unfortunately, this type of fear mongering has been around since America was constituted. The problem with that…

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The Black Robe Regiment: How a Group of Patriots Founded America

TweetShareShareThey were called the “Black Robe Regiment.” A group of patriots who served in Congress, presided over influential American schools, led troops in the Revolutionary War, signed the Declaration of Independence, Bill of Rights and other important founding documents. Their names? JOHN WITHERSPOON (President of Princeton) JOHN P. MUHLENBERG (Revolutionary War General) FREDERICK A. MUHLENBERG…

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The Yale Man: How One American Preacher Lit the Fuse for the First Great Awakening Revivals

TweetShareShareAmerica’s first colleges were in the Ivy League. And they were created for a distinct purpose. The original 1636 purpose of a Harvard education was to “…advance learning and perpetuate it to posterity: dreading to leave an illiterate ministry to the churches, when our present ministers shall lie in the dust.” Essentially, Harvard trained the…

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Alexis de Tocqueville: The French Man Who Saw America’s Past, Present and Future

TweetShareShare “[It’s] the most comprehensive and penetrating analysis of the relationship between character and society in America that has ever been written.” That’s how one historian described Alexis de Tocqueville’s Democracy in America; a work considered among the most influential books of the 19th century. Published in two volumes between 1835 and 1840, Alexis de…

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The Pain of Thomas Paine

Thomas Paine

TweetShareShareIn 1776 Thomas Paine was a “rock star” among American patriots. His writings inspired a loosely united thirteen colonies to revolt against the great British Empire. But Paine lived down to his name. He’d die a “penniless drunk in Manhattan,” scorned by most of the Founding Fathers. Only six people attended his funeral.   Thomas…

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Molly Pitcher: The Revolutionary Woman Behind the Name

Molly Pitcher

TweetShareShare   Betsy Ross. Martha Washington. Dolly Madison. These were all great women of the American Revolution. But have you heard of Mary Ludwig Hays? She might be the bravest, strongest and most patriotic woman of them all.   During the Revolution women were cut from a different cloth. Many women refused to stay home,…

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