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Dr. Chromey can train your staff, group or conference either in-person or virtually. Contact him to brainstorm the best approach for your need.

Dr. Rick Chromey has numerous workshops available related to his new book GenTech: An American Story of Technology, Change and Who We Really Are (Morgan James, 2020).

However, he also has popular and long standing workshops related to leadership,  education and parenting, including:

GenTech Workshop AD Banner

GENTECH: A HISTORY OF AMERICA SINCE 1900

GenTech: An American Story of Technology, Change and Who We Really Are
Objective: A general overview of American generations since 1900.

What is a Baby Boomer? Gen X? Millennial or Gen Z? In this fast-paced, visual, insightful and enjoyable journey through American history since 1900, you'll discover a dynamic fresh perspective to who we really are as a people. After all, we are less defined by a birth demographic or alphabet name than we are by the technology in which we came of age. We are the generations of technology--audio, visual, digital--from the Great "TNT" Generation to the emerging Robo Generation.

The participants will:

  • Learn an historical overview of technology since 1900.
  • Understand how generations are better viewed through a technological lens.
  • Translate and apply technological generations to the business, educational, parental or pastoral cultures.
Let's Talk TECH Workshop AD Banner

LET'S TALK T.E.C.H. (AT WORK)

Reimagining Generations and How Technology Matters in the Workplace

Objective: An overview of generations born since 1940 and how they interact at work.

 

Baby Boomers. Gen X. Millennials. Gen Z.

Four American generations dominate the workplace landscape, but do we understand who we really are? And what if there’s a better way to frame generations? In this engaging, insightful conversation, discover how the technology we experienced in youth (ages 10 to 25) brands our generational personality, guides our communication and frames our workplace habits. Special attention will be given to the Net and iTech Generations (born since 1990) now entering the workforce.

The participants will:

  • Discover why current generational labels fail to explain differences how we work.
  • Understand how television, space, gaming, computer, cellphone and the Internet have shaped American generations since 1940.
  • Learn the T.E.C.H. (Translate, Elaborate, Collaborate and Habituate) strategy for better workplace interactions, change and productivity.
  • Brainstorm strategies to better motivate employees and staff through generational technologies.
Let's Talk TECH in the Classroom Workshop AD Banner

LET'S TALK T.E.C.H. (AT SCHOOL)

Objective: An overview of generations born since 1940 and how they interact when learning.

 

Reimagining Generations and How Technology Matters in the Classroom

Objective: An overview of generations born since 1990 and how they interact in school.

 

Millennials. Gen Z. Generation Alpha.

Three American generations dominate the learning landscape, but do we understand who they really are? And what if there’s a better way to frame generations? In this engaging, insightful conversation, discover how the technology they experienced in youth is branding their generational personality, guides their communication and frames their learning habits.

The participants will:

  • Discover why current generational labels fail to explain differences how we learn.
  • Understand the Internet, smartphone, social media, robotics and artificial intelligence have shaped (and will shape) American generations born since 1990.
  • Learn the T.E.C.H. (Translate, Elaborate, Collaborate and Habituate) strategy for better teaching interactions, learning and academic productivity.
  • Brainstorm strategies to better motivate students through generational technologies.
GenBoom Workshop AD Banner

GEN BOOM: REACHING THE TELEVISION AND SPACE GENERATIONS

From Black and White to Color: Understanding Americans Born Between 1940 and 1980

Objective: An analysis of Americans born between 1940 and 1990, including the Television Generation (1940-1960), the Space Generation (1950-1970), the Gamer Generation (1960-1980) and the Cable Television Generation (1970-1990). Essentially understanding what’s traditionally been known as Boomers and Xers.

The participants will:

  • Recognize the influence of television and space technology upon those born between 1940 and 1980.
  • Learn how to better communicate with adults (between 40 and 60) in the workplace, school, home and church.
  • Discover why "boomer" and "Gen X" labels ultimately fail to help us understand these generational cohorts.

Gen Next Workshop AD Banner

GEN NExT: REACHING THE COMPUTER AND NET GENERATIONS

Growing Up Digital: Understanding Americans Born Between 1980 and 2010


Objective: An analysis of Americans born between 1980 and 2010: the PC/CP Generation (1980-2000) and the Net Generation (1990-2010).

Known as the Millennials, the generations born between 1980 and 2010 have become powerful American generations. Also known as Gen Y and Gen Z, these young Americans grew up in a cyber landscape with a new alphabet and cultural language: .MP3, .jpeg, .pdf, DVR, GPS, CD, DVD, omg. In this engaging session, you'll learn how these "www" satellite and cell phone generations are vastly different, why they act the way they do and how leaders, teachers, pastors and parents can better communicate with them.

The participants will:

  • Recognize the influence of computer, mobile and net technology upon those born between 1980 and 2000.
  • Learn how to better communicate with young adults (between 20 and 40) in the workplace, school, home and church.
  • Discover why "millennial," "iGen" and "Gen Y or Z" labels ultimately fail to help us understand this generational cohort.

Rise of iTechs Workshop AD Banner

RISE OF THE iTECHS: REIMAGINING
GENERATION Z

Understanding Americans Born Between 2000 and 2020


Objective: An analysis of the iTech Generation (a.k.a. Gen Z)  born between 2000 and 2020.

Born since 2000, Americans are growing up in a 3D (digital, decentralized, diverse) culture that’s primed with social media, clouds and streams, and hyper-sensory media. In this insightful session you'll discover how the iTech Generation, as they enter the workplace in the 2020s, will reimagine how we educate, lead, worship, socialize, entertain and purchase.

The participants will:

  • Recognize the influence of smart technology, social media and streamed content upon those born after the year 2000.
  • Learn how to better communicate with children and teenagers (birth to age 20) in the workplace, school, home and church.
  • Discover why "iGen" and "Gen Z" labels ultimately fail to help us understand these generational cohorts.
Meet the Robos Workshop AD Banner

MEET THE ROBOS: THE FUTURE IS H.A.I.R.Y.!

Understanding America’s Youngest Generation (Born Since 2010)


Objective: An analysis of the emerging Robotics Generation (2010-2030).

Born since 2010, America's youngest generation is growing up in a H.A.I.R.Y. cyber culture that will witness an explosion of holographic, artificial intelligence and robotic technology in the 2020s and 2030s. In this insightful session you'll discover how the Robo Generation will rearrange how we educate, lead, worship, socialize, entertain and purchase in the future. You'll also learn how holograms, artificial intelligence and robotics will define their lives for the next quarter century.

The participants will:

  • Recognize the influence of holographic, artificial intelligence and robotic technology upon those born after the year 2010.
  • Learn how to better communicate with children and preteens in the school, home and church.
  • Discover why the “Alpha Generation” label ultimately fails to help us understand these generational cohorts.
Reaching the iTech Family Workshop AD Banner

REACHING THE iTECH FAMILY

Understanding and Working With Postmodern Parents (born after 1980)
Objective: An analysis of Millennial Generation and their parenting practices.

Today’s parents are a different breed. Born after 1980, this cohort of Americans have grown up in a digital, cyber, wireless, and “smart” world. Consequently, they are parenting differently than their Gen X and Boomer parents did. In this insightful workshop you’ll discover not just the “why” but discuss “how” businesses, organizations, schools and churches can effectively communicate with postmillennial parents.

The participants will:

  • Recognize how computers, cell phones and the Internet have influenced and framed iTech parents and their families.
  • Learn how to better communicate with parents in the marketplace, school or church.
  • Discuss fresh strategies for reaching parents and families in a digital and cyber culture.

FOR MORE INFORMATION:

rick@rickchromey.com

208.914.1404